The decorate() proposal was that no new syntax be implemented -- instead a magic function that used introspection to manipulate the following function. Both Jp Calderone and Philip Eby produced implementations of functions that did this. Guido was pretty firmly against this -- with no new syntax, the magicness of a function like this is extremely high:
Now, assume one also desires the ability to add borders to windows. Again, the original Window class has no support. The ScrollingWindow subclass now poses a problem, because it has effectively created a new kind of window. If one wishes to add border support to many but not all windows, one must create subclasses WindowWithBorder and ScrollingWindowWithBorder etc. This problem gets worse with every new feature or window subtype to be added. For the decorator solution, we simply create a new BorderedWindowDecorator—at runtime, we can decorate existing windows with the ScrollingWindowDecorator or the BorderedWindowDecorator or both, as we see fit. Notice that if the functionality needs to be added to all Windows, you could modify the base class and that will do. On the other hand, sometimes (e.g., using external frameworks) it is not possible, legal, or convenient to modify the base class.
The oldest known paintings are at the Grotte Chauvet in France, which some historians believe are about 32,000 years old. They are engraved and painted using red ochre and black pigment, and they show horses, rhinoceros, lions, buffalo, mammoth, abstract designs and what are possibly partial human figures. However, the earliest evidence of the act of painting has been discovered in two rock-shelters in Arnhem Land, in northern Australia. In the lowest layer of material at these sites, there are used pieces of ochre estimated to be 60,000 years old. Archaeologists have also found a fragment of rock painting preserved in a limestone rock-shelter in the Kimberley region of North-Western Australia, that is dated 40,000 years old.[7] There are examples of cave paintings all over the world—in Italy, France, Spain, Portugal, China, Australia, Mexico,[8] etc. In Western cultures, oil painting and watercolor painting have rich and complex traditions in style and subject matter. In the East, ink and color ink historically predominated the choice of media, with equally rich and complex traditions.
The Thistle Trafalgar Square Hotel is located on a quiet side street right in the heart of London's West End. All 108 bedrooms at this four-star hotel have been recently refurbished and offer a great standard of comfort and style. In addition, the Royal Trafalgar has a ground floor restaurant which also benefits from a terrace so you can experience al fresco dining in the center of London. The Role: Our guests deserve the best and that means operating hotels with the highest standards of maintenance and upkeep. As Maintenance Operative you will have the opportunity to contribute towards a fabulous guest experience by working hard to maintain the fixtures and fittings of the building. • Ensuring all defective fittings, breakdowns and malfunctions of equipment are fixed without delay • Communicating effectively and working closely with other departments such as Housekeeping • Ensuring that any emergencies are dealt with immediately and effectively minimizing any serious occurrences, hazards or inconvenience to guests and colleagues alike What we look for: • Positive, friendly individuals to join a like-minded team • NVQ electrician's qualification, experience in basic plumbing, basic carpentry, tiling and grouting skills and general handyperson skills with painting and decorating experience • Excellent communication skills • Total commitment to customer ser

Moreover, the use of language is only an abstraction for a color equivalent. The word "red", for example, can cover a wide range of variations from the pure red of the visible spectrum of light. There is not a formalized register of different colors in the way that there is agreement on different notes in music, such as F or C♯. For a painter, color is not simply divided into basic (primary) and derived (complementary or mixed) colors (like red, blue, green, brown, etc.).
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