Cheval Residences are currently recruiting a Maintenance Engineer to join our Luxury serviced apartments based in Kensington. The successful applicant will be a qualified engineer and will ideally have some experience working in a similar role within a luxury hospitality environment. As a multi skilled engineer you will cover all aspects of maintenance including plumbing, mechanical, plant and building fabric etc. The maintenance department at Cheval Thorney Court and Cheval Hyde Park Gate provides both a proactive and reactive service to ensure that the property is maintained to a high standard. The department covers all aspects of maintenance including plumbing, air conditioning, electrics and building fabric. Some of the tasks will include: • To be the first line of response to all maintenance issues and resolve matters in an effective manner. · •To carry out engineering tasks ensuring high standards are consistently delivered. · •To ensure apartmen
Painter & Decorator - The Berkeley In fashionable Knightsbridge, The Berkeley is one of the leading 5-star hotels in London; breath-taking luxury hotel suites fuse comfort, stylish design and the latest innovations; a heavenly swimming pool and luxury spa provide a seventh-floor retreat overlooking Hyde Park. The stars come out for award-winning cocktails at the Blue Bar, and fashionistas join us for Prêt-à-Portea, our catwalk-inspired London afternoon tea in our Collins Room. The Berkeley forms part of the Maybourne Hotel Group, London's ultra-luxury hotel company. A career with Maybourne Hotel Group will put you side by side with people who amaze our guests with individual experiences and aim for perfection in everything they do. Role Description: As Painter and Decorator in our hotel you will be responsible for upholding our beautiful bedrooms to a pristine condition.Variety is the key to your work, as many rooms are individually designed and decorated to ensure you always have a challenge. You will ensure the paint work is neat throughout the building and you will also be required to carry out wallpapering work and tiling throughout the entire building.
The decorate() proposal was that no new syntax be implemented -- instead a magic function that used introspection to manipulate the following function. Both Jp Calderone and Philip Eby produced implementations of functions that did this. Guido was pretty firmly against this -- with no new syntax, the magicness of a function like this is extremely high:
In object-oriented programming, the decorator pattern is a design pattern that allows behavior to be added to an individual object, dynamically, without affecting the behavior of other objects from the same class.[1] The decorator pattern is often useful for adhering to the Single Responsibility Principle, as it allows functionality to be divided between classes with unique areas of concern.[2] The decorator pattern is structurally nearly identical to the chain of responsibility pattern, the difference being that in a chain of responsibility, exactly one of the classes handles the request, while for the decorator, all classes handle the request.

There have been a number of objections raised to this location -- the primary one is that it's the first real Python case where a line of code has an effect on a following line. The syntax available in 2.4a3 requires one decorator per line (in a2, multiple decorators could be specified on the same line), and the final decision for 2.4 final stayed one decorator per line.
With the introduction of Classes in TypeScript and ES6, there now exist certain scenarios that require additional features to support annotating or modifying classes and class members. Decorators provide a way to add both annotations and a meta-programming syntax for class declarations and members. Decorators are a stage 2 proposal for JavaScript and are available as an experimental feature of TypeScript.
In a previous article, we discussed how to use the strategy pattern to dynamically change an object’s behavior at runtime. Classically, polymorphism in object-oriented design is static and achieved through inheritance; however, with the strategy pattern you can accomplish the same goal dynamically. Indeed, this is an excellent way to handle situations when you need an object to exhibit different behavior at different times. However, it’s worth noting that the strategy pattern requires mutation of the object you’re working with. By using the strategy pattern, you are necessarily changing the algorithm that an object uses for a given behavior. In some situations, it may be preferable not to mutate a given object. Or more likely, you won’t even have the option of mutating an object because it may come from a codebase over which you have no control (such as an external library). Such cases are relatively common; however, it’s still possible to enhance an immutable object’s behavior. One effective means to do so is with the decorator pattern.

Portrait paintings are representations of a person, in which the face and its expression is predominant. The intent is to display the likeness, personality, and even the mood of the person. The art of the portrait flourished in Ancient Greek and especially Roman sculpture, where sitters demanded individualized and realistic portraits, even unflattering ones. One of the best-known portraits in the Western world is Leonardo da Vinci's painting titled Mona Lisa, which is thought to be a portrait of Lisa Gherardini, the wife of Francesco del Giocondo.[40]


This difference becomes most important when there are several independent ways of extending functionality. In some object-oriented programming languages, classes cannot be created at runtime, and it is typically not possible to predict, at design time, what combinations of extensions will be needed. This would mean that a new class would have to be made for every possible combination. By contrast, decorators are objects, created at runtime, and can be combined on a per-use basis. The I/O Streams implementations of both Java and the .NET Framework incorporate the decorator pattern.
Painters take care of the outside of buildings, city infrastructure and any kind of new architecture development. The handiwork of painters surrounds us at every turn. Ron Yarbrough, founder and president of Pro-Spec Painting Inc., says the painting profession's focus areas are endless – there's something for everyone. "I think there are tremendous opportunities for those that want to enter the painting trade. And I think that [the field] has so many different segments to it – all the way from infrastructure to new construction of commercial buildings and many types of decorative art and restoration." The will and patience to do the work is all it takes to succeed, he adds. "People who are really committed to learning the trade can do well at it. If they set their goals high, they can make a really good living at it." Painters commonly work for building finishing contractors or in the residential building construction industry. Unlike carpenters, painters typically don't build frameworks and structures; they apply paint, stain and coatings to them.
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