The current method for transforming functions and methods (for instance, declaring them as a class or static method) is awkward and can lead to code that is difficult to understand. Ideally, these transformations should be made at the same point in the code where the declaration itself is made. This PEP introduces new syntax for transformations of a function or method declaration.
This difference becomes most important when there are several independent ways of extending functionality. In some object-oriented programming languages, classes cannot be created at runtime, and it is typically not possible to predict, at design time, what combinations of extensions will be needed. This would mean that a new class would have to be made for every possible combination. By contrast, decorators are objects, created at runtime, and can be combined on a per-use basis. The I/O Streams implementations of both Java and the .NET Framework incorporate the decorator pattern.

In this snippet we have a class hierarchy with a SimpleMessage at the top. The SimpleMessage class has a constructor that accepts a content string as well as two methods: GetMessage; and, PrintMessage. Down the hierarchy we have three subclasses: ExcitedMessage; QuizzicalMessage; and, ExcitedAndQuizzicalMessage. The only difference in the subclasses is that they override the SimpleMessage constructor to change the content string and append various exclamations. When we instantiate various message objects, using the same content string, and iterate over them, each has their own unique output.

The delegate injection point must be an injected field, initializer method parameter or bean constructor method parameter. If an injection point that is not an injected field, initializer method parameter or bean constructor method parameter is annotated @Delegate, the container automatically detects the problem and treats it as a definition error.
Maintenance Assistant - New Hotel Opening! - Covent Garden Nadler hotels is preparing to open it’s 5 th Hotel in one of the best locations in London – just 2 minutes’ walk away from the world famous Covent Garden. Nadler has an impressive track record for guest satisfaction – being in the top 5% on Tripadvisor in all of the current hotels – Kensington, Soho, Victoria, and Liverpool, and was the winner of Best Small Group Hotel Employer at the Caterer.com Hospitality Awards. We are looking for the best service professionals in the industry to join our growing group to contribute and share in our success. Each of our hotels offers a range of intelligent and extremely comfortable rooms, equipped with a host of features including ultra-fast Wi-Fi, interactive TVs, high quality pocket-sprung beds, spacious bathrooms with powerful showers, and bespoke in-room mini kitchens. Whilst all of this already impresses our guests – It’s our people who turn a good stay into an excellent one! So if you are one of the best, and want to work with like-minded people – apply now! The role What we ask for…. Great communication ski
Water miscible oil paints (also called "water soluble" or "water-mixable") is a modern variety of oil paint engineered to be thinned and cleaned up with water, rather than having to use chemicals such as turpentine. It can be mixed and applied using the same techniques as traditional oil-based paint, but while still wet it can be effectively removed from brushes, palettes, and rags with ordinary soap and water. Its water solubility comes from the use of an oil medium in which one end of the molecule has been altered to bind loosely to water molecules, as in a solution.
Decorator Abstractions: A decorator abstraction is an abstract class that implements the component interface. Critically, the decorator abstraction must also contain a pointer to some instance of the same interface. Inside the decorator abstraction, each of the component interface behaviors will be delegated to whichever concrete component the pointer indicates.
Painters deal practically with pigments,[6] so "blue" for a painter can be any of the blues: phthalocyanine blue, Prussian blue, indigo, Cobalt blue, ultramarine, and so on. Psychological and symbolical meanings of color are not, strictly speaking, means of painting. Colors only add to the potential, derived context of meanings, and because of this, the perception of a painting is highly subjective. The analogy with music is quite clear—sound in music (like a C note) is analogous to "light" in painting, "shades" to dynamics, and "coloration" is to painting as the specific timbre of musical instruments is to music. These elements do not necessarily form a melody (in music) of themselves; rather, they can add different contexts to it.
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