The decorator pattern, also known as the wrapper pattern, is when you wrap an object within another object, thus providing a means of enhancing or overriding certain behavior. The wrapper object will delegate any incoming method calls to the original object, unless it defines a new method to enhance or replace the original object’s behavior. By using the decorator pattern, you can dynamically create as many decorated objects as you want, each enhancing the behavior of the original object in a unique way — and all without mutating the original object. In this manner, you can effectively add, remove, or extend behaviors at runtime.


Moreover, the use of language is only an abstraction for a color equivalent. The word "red", for example, can cover a wide range of variations from the pure red of the visible spectrum of light. There is not a formalized register of different colors in the way that there is agreement on different notes in music, such as F or C♯. For a painter, color is not simply divided into basic (primary) and derived (complementary or mixed) colors (like red, blue, green, brown, etc.).

Encaustic painting, also known as hot wax painting, involves using heated beeswax to which colored pigments are added. The liquid/paste is then applied to a surface—usually prepared wood, though canvas and other materials are often used. The simplest encaustic mixture can be made from adding pigments to beeswax, but there are several other recipes that can be used—some containing other types of waxes, damar resin, linseed oil, or other ingredients. Pure, powdered pigments can be purchased and used, though some mixtures use oil paints or other forms of pigment. Metal tools and special brushes can be used to shape the paint before it cools, or heated metal tools can be used to manipulate the wax once it has cooled onto the surface. Other materials can be encased or collaged into the surface, or layered, using the encaustic medium to adhere it to the surface.
The Crowne Plaza London Kings Cross has recently completed its exciting journey to emerge as the newest Crowne Plaza hotel in London following a multi-million pound refurbishment and re-branding from Holiday Inn. Our hotel has 429 newly designed bedrooms, the first franchised Belgo Restaurant and the Bloom Bar & Kitchen, which opened a few months ago. The hotel also has 6 state of the art Meeting & Event spaces, a Club Lounge and a Leisure Club. A new opportunity has arisen for the position of Maintenance Shift Engineer. This position would suit a multi-skilled, hands-on, motivated and hard-working individual looking to develop. A person should be adaptable, flexible and able to work both independently and with the team. Experience within the hotel industry and Maintenance/Engineering is desirable but not critically essential. Ideally the candidate will have electrical, mechanical, carpentry, plumbing and decorating/tiling skills and a reasonable working knowledge of stringent PPM of automated plant equipment and general building maintenance. A good level of English is essential. Key responsibilities -Report to the Maintenance Supervisor before your shift starts to go through your daily tasks. -Promptly and efficiently attends and inspects all maintenance requests, defects or Health & Safety matters su
The discussion continued on and off on python-dev from February 2002 through July 2004. Hundreds and hundreds of posts were made, with people proposing many possible syntax variations. Guido took a list of proposals to EuroPython 2004 [7], where a discussion took place. Subsequent to this, he decided that we'd have the Java-style [10] @decorator syntax, and this appeared for the first time in 2.4a2. Barry Warsaw named this the 'pie-decorator' syntax, in honor of the Pie-thon Parrot shootout which occurred around the same time as the decorator syntax, and because the @ looks a little like a pie. Guido outlined his case [8] on Python-dev, including this piece [9] on some of the (many) rejected forms.
Color, made up of hue, saturation, and value, dispersed over a surface is the essence of painting, just as pitch and rhythm are the essence of music. Color is highly subjective, but has observable psychological effects, although these can differ from one culture to the next. Black is associated with mourning in the West, but in the East, white is. Some painters, theoreticians, writers and scientists, including Goethe,[3] Kandinsky,[4] and Newton,[5] have written their own color theory.
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