With the introduction of Classes in TypeScript and ES6, there now exist certain scenarios that require additional features to support annotating or modifying classes and class members. Decorators provide a way to add both annotations and a meta-programming syntax for class declarations and members. Decorators are a stage 2 proposal for JavaScript and are available as an experimental feature of TypeScript.
In Python 2.4a3 (to be released this Thursday), everything remains as currently in CVS. For 2.4b1, I will consider a change of @ to some other single character, even though I think that @ has the advantage of being the same character used by a similar feature in Java. It's been argued that it's not quite the same, since @ in Java is used for attributes that don't change semantics. But Python's dynamic nature makes that its syntactic elements never mean quite the same thing as similar constructs in other languages, and there is definitely significant overlap. Regarding the impact on 3rd party tools: IPython's author doesn't think there's going to be much impact; Leo's author has said that Leo will survive (although it will cause him and his users some transitional pain). I actually expect that picking a character that's already used elsewhere in Python's syntax might be harder for external tools to adapt to, since parsing will have to be more subtle in that case. But I'm frankly undecided, so there's some wiggle room here. I don't want to consider further syntactic alternatives at this point: the buck has to stop at some point, everyone has had their say, and the show must go on.

HIX Restaurants are looking for bright and passionate individuals to work in a fast paced, vibrant and dynamic environment. We are currently seeking an experienced individual to work at HIX Soho in London’s West End.This is a great opportunity to work with chef, restaurateur and food writer Mark Hix, who has restaurants in London and Dorset, all serving the best of British seasonal produce. Bartending experience will be considered a bonus for the role. Experience in a similar role and a basic command of English is essential. You will be motivated, hardworking and able to cope with a demanding role. Duties will include: Cleaning Helping set up the restaurant/bar areas. Polishing glassware, cutlery and plates. Running food We strive for casual excellence throughout the group – have you got it? In return for your hard work, we are offering a competitive London wage and staff benefits to include: • up to 50% staff discount across all HIX restaurants • 28 days holiday rising by 1 day per year to 33 days • Staff food (AM & PM) • £500 recruitment initiative All applicants must either be eligible to live and work in the UK or must obtain permits to work in the UK prior to application. Documented evidence of eligibility will be required from candidates as part of the recruitment process. Because we receive a lot of applications we’re simply not able to reply to all of them direc
Did you get it? We just applied the previously learned principles. This is exactly what the decorators do in Python! They wrap a function and modify its behaviour in one way or the another. Now you might be wondering that we did not use the @ anywhere in our code? That is just a short way of making up a decorated function. Here is how we could have run the previous code sample using @.

There is some history in Java using @ initially as a marker in Javadoc comments [24] and later in Java 1.5 for annotations [10], which are similar to Python decorators. The fact that @ was previously unused as a token in Python also means it's clear there is no possibility of such code being parsed by an earlier version of Python, leading to possibly subtle semantic bugs. It also means that ambiguity of what is a decorator and what isn't is removed. That said, @ is still a fairly arbitrary choice. Some have suggested using | instead.
The discussion continued on and off on python-dev from February 2002 through July 2004. Hundreds and hundreds of posts were made, with people proposing many possible syntax variations. Guido took a list of proposals to EuroPython 2004 [7], where a discussion took place. Subsequent to this, he decided that we'd have the Java-style [10] @decorator syntax, and this appeared for the first time in 2.4a2. Barry Warsaw named this the 'pie-decorator' syntax, in honor of the Pie-thon Parrot shootout which occurred around the same time as the decorator syntax, and because the @ looks a little like a pie. Guido outlined his case [8] on Python-dev, including this piece [9] on some of the (many) rejected forms.
Did you get it? We just applied the previously learned principles. This is exactly what the decorators do in Python! They wrap a function and modify its behaviour in one way or the another. Now you might be wondering that we did not use the @ anywhere in our code? That is just a short way of making up a decorated function. Here is how we could have run the previous code sample using @.
Encaustic painting, also known as hot wax painting, involves using heated beeswax to which colored pigments are added. The liquid/paste is then applied to a surface—usually prepared wood, though canvas and other materials are often used. The simplest encaustic mixture can be made from adding pigments to beeswax, but there are several other recipes that can be used—some containing other types of waxes, damar resin, linseed oil, or other ingredients. Pure, powdered pigments can be purchased and used, though some mixtures use oil paints or other forms of pigment. Metal tools and special brushes can be used to shape the paint before it cools, or heated metal tools can be used to manipulate the wax once it has cooled onto the surface. Other materials can be encased or collaged into the surface, or layered, using the encaustic medium to adhere it to the surface.
The Crowne Plaza London Kings Cross has recently completed its exciting journey to emerge as the newest Crowne Plaza hotel in London following a multi-million pound refurbishment and re-branding from Holiday Inn. Our hotel has 429 newly designed bedrooms, the first franchised Belgo Restaurant and the Bloom Bar & Kitchen, which opened a few months ago. The hotel also has 6 state of the art Meeting & Event spaces, a Club Lounge and a Leisure Club. A new opportunity has arisen for the position of Maintenance Shift Engineer. This position would suit a multi-skilled, hands-on, motivated and hard-working individual looking to develop. A person should be adaptable, flexible and able to work both independently and with the team. Experience within the hotel industry and Maintenance/Engineering is desirable but not critically essential. Ideally the candidate will have electrical, mechanical, carpentry, plumbing and decorating/tiling skills and a reasonable working knowledge of stringent PPM of automated plant equipment and general building maintenance. A good level of English is essential. Key responsibilities -Report to the Maintenance Supervisor before your shift starts to go through your daily tasks. -Promptly and efficiently attends and inspects all maintenance requests, defects or Health & Safety matters su
Whether you are looking for exterior or interior painting services, we are here for you. At MW Decorating Services, we offer a wide range of services including bespoke painting, decorating and more. We have expert painters and decorators to paint and decorate your home to the highest standards. All you have to do is discuss your requirements with us and we will provide you with a suitable solution. Get in touch with us now for a free, no-obligation quote. We serve customers in Hertfordshire. 
Categories: English 2-syllable wordsEnglish terms with IPA pronunciationEnglish terms with audio linksEnglish words suffixed with -er (agent noun)English terms derived from Middle FrenchEnglish lemmasEnglish nounsEnglish countable nounsEnglish terms with obsolete sensesen:NauticalAmerican EnglishEnglish agent nounsEnglish terms with multiple etymologiesen:Artistsen:People
×