To calculate the tenth Fibonacci number, you should really only need to calculate the preceding Fibonacci numbers, but this implementation somehow needs a whopping 177 calculations. It gets worse quickly: 21891 calculations are needed for fibonacci(20) and almost 2.7 million calculations for the 30th number. This is because the code keeps recalculating Fibonacci numbers that are already known.

There is general agreement that syntactic support is desirable to the current state of affairs. Guido mentioned syntactic support for decorators [2] in his DevDay keynote presentation at the 10th Python Conference [3], though he later said [5] it was only one of several extensions he proposed there "semi-jokingly". Michael Hudson raised the topic [4] on python-dev shortly after the conference, attributing the initial bracketed syntax to an earlier proposal on comp.lang.python by Gareth McCaughan [6].
Enforcement of this Act by the Painter-Stainers Company was sought up until the early 19th century, with master painters gathering irregularly to decide the fees that a journeyman could charge, and also instigating an early version of a job centre in 1769, advertising in the London newspapers a "house of call" system to advertise for journeymen and also for journeymen to advertise for work. The guild's power in setting the fee a journeyman could charge was eventually overturned by law in 1827, and the period after this saw the guild's power diminish, along with that of the other guilds; the guilds were superseded by trade unions, with the Operative United Painters' Union forming sometime around 1831.[2]

You saw that, to define a decorator, you typically define a function returning a wrapper function. The wrapper function uses *args and **kwargs to pass on arguments to the decorated function. If you want your decorator to also take arguments, you need to nest the wrapper function inside another function. In this case, you usually end up with three return statements.


Gouache is a water-based paint consisting of pigment and other materials designed to be used in an opaque painting method. Gouache differs from watercolor in that the particles are larger, the ratio of pigment to water is much higher, and an additional, inert, white pigment such as chalk is also present. This makes gouache heavier and more opaque, with greater reflective qualities. Like all watermedia, it is diluted with water.[21]
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