Painters must have manual dexterity as well as steady nerves to work in high places. They should not be allergic to or bothered by paint fumes, toxic materials and spray dust. They should have a certain artistic sense in order to do a first-class job. Good eyesight and sense of color is especially important to properly mix paint to specific colors.

Painters deal practically with pigments,[6] so "blue" for a painter can be any of the blues: phthalocyanine blue, Prussian blue, indigo, Cobalt blue, ultramarine, and so on. Psychological and symbolical meanings of color are not, strictly speaking, means of painting. Colors only add to the potential, derived context of meanings, and because of this, the perception of a painting is highly subjective. The analogy with music is quite clear—sound in music (like a C note) is analogous to "light" in painting, "shades" to dynamics, and "coloration" is to painting as the specific timbre of musical instruments is to music. These elements do not necessarily form a melody (in music) of themselves; rather, they can add different contexts to it.
Pay by Experience for a Painter And Decorator has a positive trend. An entry-level Painter And Decorator with less than 5 years of experience can expect to earn an average total compensation of $44,000 based on 16 salaries provided by anonymous users. Average total compensation includes tips, bonus, and overtime pay. A Painter And Decorator with mid-career experience which includes employees with 5 to 10 years of experience can expect to earn an average total compensation of $48,000 based on 21 salaries. An experienced Painter And Decorator which includes employees with 10 to 20 years of experience can expect to earn an average total compensation of $44,000 based on 33 salaries. A Painter And Decorator with late-career experience which includes employees with greater than 20 years of experience can expect to earn an average total compensation of $50,000 based on 46 salaries.
Painters deal practically with pigments,[6] so "blue" for a painter can be any of the blues: phthalocyanine blue, Prussian blue, indigo, Cobalt blue, ultramarine, and so on. Psychological and symbolical meanings of color are not, strictly speaking, means of painting. Colors only add to the potential, derived context of meanings, and because of this, the perception of a painting is highly subjective. The analogy with music is quite clear—sound in music (like a C note) is analogous to "light" in painting, "shades" to dynamics, and "coloration" is to painting as the specific timbre of musical instruments is to music. These elements do not necessarily form a melody (in music) of themselves; rather, they can add different contexts to it.

Moreover, the use of language is only an abstraction for a color equivalent. The word "red", for example, can cover a wide range of variations from the pure red of the visible spectrum of light. There is not a formalized register of different colors in the way that there is agreement on different notes in music, such as F or C♯. For a painter, color is not simply divided into basic (primary) and derived (complementary or mixed) colors (like red, blue, green, brown, etc.).
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