More recently, professional painters are responsible for all preparation prior to painting. All scraping, sanding, wallpaper removal, caulking, drywall or wood repair, patching, stain removal, filling nail holes or any defects with plaster or putty, cleaning, taping, preparation and priming are considered to be done by the professional contracted painter.
Heller’s protagonist, Jim Stegner, is an unschooled but talented painter who struggles with drink, with womanizing, and with his temper. These traits have led him to be a killer, although Heller goes to great pains to let us know these acts are not premeditated. They’ve also, in accordance with these United States’ innate streak of violence, allowed him to be a cult figure - a talent around whom one feels it necessary to walk on eggshells. (For what it’s worth, this trait is to this reader and social observer the cause of a hollowness within the national psyche.) Stegner wants atonement for his acts, but he doesn’t know how to go about that. So Heller must allow Stegner to be the subject of retributive violence, which allows the painter, as might happen to a pre-adolescent child, to have atonement forced on him. Stegner is as a person and as a literary creation, a mess. Perhaps Heller intends him to be a faux Hemingway: hard drinking, bullying and a crybaby when those tables are turned on him. Stegner doesn’t seem to have the backbone about which an anti-hero’s fatal flaws can be built, though; he’s too much at the whims of fate for that. Heller tries to create philosophical depth for Stegner, but these attempts ring hollow. What he has created in Stegner, however, is a depiction of an instinctive artist, something the American psyche always seeks: talent and success untrammeled by subjecting that psyche to training and the lessons of culture and history. That Stegner is, in the end, a talented but pitiful figure, should tell the reader something very important: instinct that refuses at least a small measure of acculturation eventually become debased.
Experience is more important than qualifications when attempting to find work. Working as a mate, or completing an apprenticeship, are both good ways to get this initial experience. If working independently as a self-employed person, experience is also necessary in order to be aware of the standard of work expected. A bad job will be easily noticed, and may lead to difficulty finding further work. When already working for a company, more in-depth courses can be completed in order to gain experience, which can sometimes lead to increases in salary. These courses could include:
Struggled to decide if this was a romance novel gone wrong, a story of a struggling artist, a chronicle on how & where to fish or a satirical farce. If it was any of these, did not work for me. 1/4 of the book is a primer on fishing, the rest bounces off the walls, trying to hit something, failing. What a romp through the absurd this novel is. Much time spent in cold creeks with nasty lures and mucky wading boots. The author kind of made the painter into a weeble wobble, he kept being punched at yet came back for more and more . The plots kind of remind me of a tv show I watched a few times. "Justified", a show about bubba dudes and dudesses in Harlen County Kentucky, the characters are portrayed as intelligent dummies, much like this novel. The Painter offers shallow, silly women, dare I say "bimbo's". The "painter" himself is a hapless "psychopath" who romps through life with no self check ability. He supposedly never means any of the harm he manages to encounter, just happens, right. Not to ruin a plot twist/surprise, but at one point a bullet is fired into the night, from a hand gun, with no light, landing hundreds of yards away and claiming it's prey. Haha, right, "I shot an arrow in the sky". It's a quick read, especially when you can Evelyn Woods it through all the tedious fishing. Yes, I know, the fishing, and the painting, were meant to be symbolic, but, it is only symbolic if the reader cares, and, this one did not !
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