A still life is a work of art depicting mostly inanimate subject matter, typically commonplace objects—which may be either natural (food, flowers, plants, rocks, or shells) or man-made (drinking glasses, books, vases, jewelry, coins, pipes, and so on). With origins in the Middle Ages and Ancient Greek/Roman art, still life paintings give the artist more leeway in the arrangement of design elements within a composition than do paintings of other types of subjects such as landscape or portraiture. Still life paintings, particularly before 1700, often contained religious and allegorical symbolism relating to the objects depicted. Some modern still life breaks the two-dimensional barrier and employs three-dimensional mixed media, and uses found objects, photography, computer graphics, as well as video and sound.

The discussion continued on and off on python-dev from February 2002 through July 2004. Hundreds and hundreds of posts were made, with people proposing many possible syntax variations. Guido took a list of proposals to EuroPython 2004 [7], where a discussion took place. Subsequent to this, he decided that we'd have the Java-style [10] @decorator syntax, and this appeared for the first time in 2.4a2. Barry Warsaw named this the 'pie-decorator' syntax, in honor of the Pie-thon Parrot shootout which occurred around the same time as the decorator syntax, and because the @ looks a little like a pie. Guido outlined his case [8] on Python-dev, including this piece [9] on some of the (many) rejected forms.

Modifying classes in this fashion is also possible, though the benefits are not as immediately apparent. Almost certainly, anything which could be done with class decorators could be done using metaclasses, but using metaclasses is sufficiently obscure that there is some attraction to having an easier way to make simple modifications to classes. For Python 2.4, only function/method decorators are being added.

We are looking for a Maintenance Operative for a brand new residential development in Southall. Full of gardens, parks, trees and water; this contemporary development is a vibrant place to work with a brilliant team of people. As Maintenance Operative you will ensure the site is well maintained providing a clean and secure environment for residents and guests at all times. Supporting the Development Manager you will keep Health & Safety standards to a maximum. Must have a full clean driving license (to operate the estate vehicle) and Construction Skills Certification Scheme (CSCS) card. Our client is one of the UK's leading residential property management companies. They are a professional and creative employer who really put their people's best interests first. Always looking for the best ideas and solutions to look after people, their homes and communities; you'll be a valued member of this lovely company. Key responsibilities: Provide general maintenance support to the Development Liaise with and provide access to authorised contractors and tradesmen Report defects / incidents (either observed or reported) and take the corrective action Carry out monthly emergency light system checks and ensure monthly fire alarm checks are undertaken with Development Manager Maintain accurate records of maintenance / lighting issues Undertake any routine general repairs /
Tempera, also known as egg tempera, is a permanent, fast-drying painting medium consisting of colored pigment mixed with a water-soluble binder medium (usually a glutinous material such as egg yolk or some other size). Tempera also refers to the paintings done in this medium. Tempera paintings are very long lasting, and examples from the first centuries CE still exist. Egg tempera was a primary method of painting until after 1500 when it was superseded by the invention of oil painting. A paint commonly called tempera (though it is not) consisting of pigment and glue size is commonly used and referred to by some manufacturers in America as poster paint.
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