Just take a look at the code again. In the if/else clause we are returning greet and welcome, not greet() and welcome(). Why is that? It’s because when you put a pair of parentheses after it, the function gets executed; whereas if you don’t put parenthesis after it, then it can be passed around and can be assigned to other variables without executing it. Did you get it? Let me explain it in a little bit more detail. When we write a = hi(), hi() gets executed and because the name is yasoob by default, the function greet is returned. If we change the statement to a = hi(name = "ali") then the welcome function will be returned. We can also do print hi()() which outputs now you are in the greet() function.

Painter & Decorator - The Berkeley In fashionable Knightsbridge, The Berkeley is one of the leading 5-star hotels in London; breath-taking luxury hotel suites fuse comfort, stylish design and the latest innovations; a heavenly swimming pool and luxury spa provide a seventh-floor retreat overlooking Hyde Park. The stars come out for award-winning cocktails at the Blue Bar, and fashionistas join us for Prêt-à-Portea, our catwalk-inspired London afternoon tea in our Collins Room. The Berkeley forms part of the Maybourne Hotel Group, London's ultra-luxury hotel company. A career with Maybourne Hotel Group will put you side by side with people who amaze our guests with individual experiences and aim for perfection in everything they do. Role Description: As Painter and Decorator in our hotel you will be responsible for upholding our beautiful bedrooms to a pristine condition.Variety is the key to your work, as many rooms are individually designed and decorated to ensure you always have a challenge. You will ensure the paint work is neat throughout the building and you will also be required to carry out wallpapering work and tiling throughout the entire building.


In 1890, the Parisian painter Maurice Denis famously asserted: "Remember that a painting—before being a warhorse, a naked woman or some story or other—is essentially a flat surface covered with colors assembled in a certain order."[16] Thus, many 20th-century developments in painting, such as Cubism, were reflections on the means of painting rather than on the external world—nature—which had previously been its core subject. Recent contributions to thinking about painting have been offered by the painter and writer Julian Bell. In his book What is Painting?, Bell discusses the development, through history, of the notion that paintings can express feelings and ideas.[17] In Mirror of The World, Bell writes:

Color, made up of hue, saturation, and value, dispersed over a surface is the essence of painting, just as pitch and rhythm are the essence of music. Color is highly subjective, but has observable psychological effects, although these can differ from one culture to the next. Black is associated with mourning in the West, but in the East, white is. Some painters, theoreticians, writers and scientists, including Goethe,[3] Kandinsky,[4] and Newton,[5] have written their own color theory.
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