Maintenance Assistant We are a serviced apartments operator with apartments dotted around primarily around the EC postcode in London. The team is vibrant, multicultural and friendly. Due to continued success and ambitious growth we are actively seeking to appoint a Maintenance Assistant to join the maintenance team who are responsible for ensuring that the apartments and the appliances are in immaculate condition. Key Responsibilities our Maintenance Assistant: Preventive and reactive maintenance Maintain the appearance of apartments; replacing broken lamps, bedroom fixtures, fittings, carrying out general repairs, moving furniture, maintaining high standards of decor Carry out short term maintenance work e.g. decorating, painting and quick repairs Work closely with all departments and be able to communicate with guests when asked To work continually with guest relations, ensuring apartments are ready for guests’ arrival Travel in and around central London either on your own or with the maintenance team Report directly to the maintenance manager Use, operate and store all tools, equipment and materials safely and securely to comply with statutory regulations e.g. COSHH Ensure that the Health and Safety regulations are always adhered to Ad hoc duties
Pastel is a painting medium in the form of a stick, consisting of pure powdered pigment and a binder.[19] The pigments used in pastels are the same as those used to produce all colored art media, including oil paints; the binder is of a neutral hue and low saturation. The color effect of pastels is closer to the natural dry pigments than that of any other process.[20] Because the surface of a pastel painting is fragile and easily smudged, its preservation requires protective measures such as framing under glass; it may also be sprayed with a fixative. Nonetheless, when made with permanent pigments and properly cared for, a pastel painting may endure unchanged for centuries. Pastels are not susceptible, as are paintings made with a fluid medium, to the cracking and discoloration that result from changes in the color, opacity, or dimensions of the medium as it dries.
Did you get it? We just applied the previously learned principles. This is exactly what the decorators do in Python! They wrap a function and modify its behaviour in one way or the another. Now you might be wondering that we did not use the @ anywhere in our code? That is just a short way of making up a decorated function. Here is how we could have run the previous code sample using @.
Painter & Decorator About the Job: An opportunity has arisen for a Painter & Decorator join our Engineering Team at Jumeirah Carlton Tower & Jumeirah Lowndes Hotel The main purpose of this Painter & Decorator role is to: Provide a friendly, courteous and professional service to our guests and colleagues whilst carrying out general decorating works, to include PPM work to all rooms and public areas Complete all PPM work in a timely manner and to the required standard To carry out repairs and maintenance to the building when needed To assist other engineering colleagues when required To use HotSOS to start and complete all works To arrive to work on time and be dressed accordingly To maintain good working relationships with all colleagues To correctly log all works and timesheets About you:
In general, functions in Python may also have side effects rather than just turning an input into an output. The print() function is a basic example of this: it returns None while having the side effect of outputting something to the console. However, to understand decorators, it is enough to think about functions as something that turns given arguments into a value.

In this snippet we have a class hierarchy with a SimpleMessage at the top. The SimpleMessage class has a constructor that accepts a content string as well as two methods: GetMessage; and, PrintMessage. Down the hierarchy we have three subclasses: ExcitedMessage; QuizzicalMessage; and, ExcitedAndQuizzicalMessage. The only difference in the subclasses is that they override the SimpleMessage constructor to change the content string and append various exclamations. When we instantiate various message objects, using the same content string, and iterate over them, each has their own unique output.
Role: Handyman Hourly pay: £12.50 plus paid over time Full time- 40/45 hours per week Immediate start and Permanent We are on the hunt for a skilled and reliable Handyman to join our maintenance department. You will be responsible for all upkeep and repair duties including maintenance, identifying the need for repairs, maintenance requests, and servicing company equipment. As a Handyman you will need to have the following skills: Resolve problems and adhere to health and safety guidelines Ability to deal with other contractors or maintenance workers Being resourceful and self-motivated Physically strong – capable of working with machinery or moving heavy equipment Being flexible Able to resolve complaints quickly and efficiently Able to work as part of a team Good communication skills We offer a competitive salary and company benefits. If this sounds like you, please apply now!
The decorator pattern, also known as the wrapper pattern, is when you wrap an object within another object, thus providing a means of enhancing or overriding certain behavior. The wrapper object will delegate any incoming method calls to the original object, unless it defines a new method to enhance or replace the original object’s behavior. By using the decorator pattern, you can dynamically create as many decorated objects as you want, each enhancing the behavior of the original object in a unique way — and all without mutating the original object. In this manner, you can effectively add, remove, or extend behaviors at runtime.
The term outsider art was coined by art critic Roger Cardinal in 1972 as an English synonym for art brut (French: [aʁ bʁyt], "raw art" or "rough art"), a label created by French artist Jean Dubuffet to describe art created outside the boundaries of official culture; Dubuffet focused particularly on art by insane-asylum inmates.[33] Outsider art has emerged as a successful art marketing category (an annual Outsider Art Fair has taken place in New York since 1992). The term is sometimes misapplied as a catch-all marketing label for art created by people outside the mainstream "art world," regardless of their circumstances or the content of their work.
Speed, portability and permanence also make aerosol paint a common graffiti medium. In the late 1970s, street graffiti writers' signatures and murals became more elaborate and a unique style developed as a factor of the aerosol medium and the speed required for illicit work. Many now recognize graffiti and street art as a unique art form and specifically manufactured aerosol paints are made for the graffiti artist. A stencil protects a surface, except the specific shape to be painted. Stencils can be purchased as movable letters, ordered as professionally cut logos or hand-cut by artists.
The oldest known paintings are at the Grotte Chauvet in France, which some historians believe are about 32,000 years old. They are engraved and painted using red ochre and black pigment, and they show horses, rhinoceros, lions, buffalo, mammoth, abstract designs and what are possibly partial human figures. However, the earliest evidence of the act of painting has been discovered in two rock-shelters in Arnhem Land, in northern Australia. In the lowest layer of material at these sites, there are used pieces of ochre estimated to be 60,000 years old. Archaeologists have also found a fragment of rock painting preserved in a limestone rock-shelter in the Kimberley region of North-Western Australia, that is dated 40,000 years old.[7] There are examples of cave paintings all over the world—in Italy, France, Spain, Portugal, China, Australia, Mexico,[8] etc. In Western cultures, oil painting and watercolor painting have rich and complex traditions in style and subject matter. In the East, ink and color ink historically predominated the choice of media, with equally rich and complex traditions.
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